American Classics

Birmingham Jail by LEADBELLY

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Some people likes to dwell on Leadbelly’s criminal record. Others made profit out of it by making him wear a striped prisoner’s outfit to promote his music, although he had been long out of jail, had a job and was married. Kids loved him and he loved them back.
I think some people should just listen to him sing and play his 12-strings guitar.

Posted Tuesday, June 29, 2010 in American Classics, Roots | 8 responses

I’m so Glad by Skip James

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Posted Monday, June 28, 2010 in American Classics, Roots | 25 responses

Long Gone Lonesome Blues by Hank Williams

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I’m planning to tour the US in my car this year. The road would be much less fun without Hank Williams’ music. Hank is America. Like Elvis and Buddy Holly, he was a white man and a red man. He suffered from terrible back pain all his life and died in the back seat of a car while on tour. But when you create classics like this and perform them the way Hank Williams did, you can never really be gone. His spirit still hangs out in the great wide open.

Posted Tuesday, May 25, 2010 in American Classics, Roots | Add a comment

Pony Blues by Charley Patton

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Charley Patton is considered by many as the founding father of the Blues. A black man, a red man and a white man. He owned a car and wore a suit everyday of the year, toured the South and was equally popular amongst blacks and whites. He was recorded during the last five years of his life. Charley suffered from a heart condition and knew early on that he wouldn’t live long. He played guitar behind his back and threw it up high in the air. He was an inspiration for many singers and guitar players who had met him, like Howlin’ Wolf and Robert Johnson.

Posted Monday, May 24, 2010 in American Classics | Add a comment